Please sign our guest book by leaving a reply below.

View our Visitor Map by clicking here.


Comments

Guest Book — 21 Comments

  1. At last, a complete source of material on one of early baseball’s elder statesman. You can almost hear Doc yelling to his outfield to get the ball into him for the relay or to smell the warm breezes off the Hudson in that magical Elysian Field. Huzzah!

  2. I think this is an informative and concise website regarding Doc Adams.
    Surely, all that
    he has given to baseball qualifies him to be a true pioneer of the game!
    Peggy Ruley

  3. Crankie,
    Thanks for pointing me to the site. I knew what I thought was a great deal about Doc Adams.
    But I guess I was just scratching the surface. A great site. A needed site. Men like Doc need to be publicized so the lies about the history of our game can get eliminated.

    I wish I could find out information about my uncle Cappy like this.
    I look forward to coming back.

    Harry “Cappy” Roberts

  4. Marjorie,

    It was nice to meet you at Old Bethpage last weekend. Doc’s comments about keeping the team going and the rhetoric employed with the players is so much like the current vintage managers are still doing today it was uncanny. The Gothams support what you are trying to do for Doc. Best wishes.

    Charles “Bugs” Klasman
    Gotham Base Ball Club of New York

    • Charles — here it is 3/22/16 and I’m only seeing your nice message today!!! It’s supposed to notify me of guest book entries….I’m so sorry!! but I thank you for your nice words….i look forward to seeing you and all your club next August at Old Bethpage if not sooner!!! And thank you again for your support! Doc and Marjorie “Crankie” Adams!!!

  5. With the authenticity (per official MLB historian John Thorn) of the recently re-discovered “Laws of Base Ball” from 1857 authored by Daniel Lucius “Doc” Adams, corresponding with newspaper accounts of the time and other historical records, there can now be no doubt that Doc Adams was the FATHER, and instrumental pioneer through his leadership of the New York Knickerbockers Base Ball Club, of the modern version of baseball as we know it today. Doc Adams precludes Alexander Cartwright. Doc Adams deserves election to the MLB Hall of Fame as soon as possible, as one of the most prominent members of the Hall. He also greatly deserves the appreciation of his crucial contributions to the game from baseball players and fans around the world.

  6. I am a Civil War re-enactor and perform many presentations for school children about daily life of a 19th century soldier, (North & South) food, clothing, marching. I am a big baseball fan also, (my grandson plays travel ball), and we will visit Cooperstown this summer and play. I am very excited to be able to include base ball in my presentation. Hope to learn more from this web site. Caps, uniforms. pictures and equipment… thanks, Mike Boyd, 33rd Ala. Infantry Regiment

  7. Mr. Boyd: Thank you so much for your very interesting comment!!! While Doc did not fight in the Civil War (he was too old), he had a nephew who fought at 2nd Manassas (Union, of course) and was severely wounded — had to “play dead” for two days as the Confederate soldiers were always on the look-out for the survivors to finish them off (dreadful). His family in NH was told he was dead but somehow it took him about three weeks to get home. He never fully recovered from his wounds and died a few years later. As for the Knickerbocker Base Ball Club and its uniform, they designed their first one on April 24, 1849. (Doc was President of the club). The uniform consisted of a white flannel shirt and blue woolen “pantaloons” and a chip (straw) hat. The woolen cap came later. You will see two buttons from Doc’s club uniform — they are c.1855. Quite possibly, the 1849 uniform was the first base ball uniform: difficult to verify.

    We hope you will enjoy your visit to Cooperstown (we were just there two weeks ago) and we wish your grandson a wonderful season of base ball, and to you, of course, we wish you much success with your re-enactments and presentations: how lucky the school children are to have access to such important historical information.

    Thank you again for your interest in Doc Adams and our site. If you have not already read either of them, might we recommend John Thorn’s book: Baseball In the Garden Of Eden and William J. Ryczek’s: Base Ball’s First Innings.

  8. Why can’t they have a special election based on the findings to be true and accurate. Why must Doc wait so long to properly take his place in Cooperstown. So thankful for all the hard work Marjorie Adams has put into getting Doc in his rightful spot in history.

    • Mr. Willison: Thank you so much for your support and kind words! Whenever Doc Adams is inducted into the Baseball Hall of Fame, the entire family will be grateful! We will continue to work towards that goal whenever it happens.

  9. Just heard about Doc Adams on the Family History Radio Program, Extreme Genes! I was so excited to learn about Doc and his contributions! Can’t wait to share this info with my family and husband! Thanks for putting this awesome website together!!

Leave a Reply